Happy New Year. Welcome to FeedbackExpress’ weekly round-up of the top five stories from the world of Amazon and ecommerce.

The Amazon Transparency Program is a counterfeiter’s worst nightmare: Forbes reports that Amazon is fighting back against counterfeiters with its item-level tracing service, Transparency. The Transparency program has been around since 2017, but Amazon enrolled new brands slowly, to work through the kinks. In the last few months, they’ve been ramping up adoption, and many brands have received invitations to the program. Amazon’s motivation is simple: provide a better customer experience by making sure that consumers get the item they ordered and not a cheap knock-off. Continue reading…

Amazon vs eBay: Why Amazon is winning the marketplace battle: Sasha Fedorenko at Tamebay reports that Amazon and eBay both attract millions of UK shoppers every day and each has both fans and detractors. Stepping out of my shoes as a Tamebay writer for a moment and thinking as a consumer, I am firmly in the Amazon camp. Here is why. Convenience is a barometer of a successful trading body whether it’s delivered via fast shipping, a vast volume of product offering or technological innovations. Being convenient means remaining relevant to your shopper. Continue reading…

Amazon wants to open more Whole Foods stores: Daniel Keyes at Business Insider reports that Amazon is interested in growing Whole Foods’ network of brick-and-mortar stores, sources told The Wall Street Journal. For example, Whole Foods employees have reportedly looked at potential locations in Idaho, southern Utah, and Wyoming where the grocer doesn’t currently have a presence. Amazon’s Prime Now grocery delivery and online order pickup would be able to reach more consumers. Continue reading…

‘We are not robots’: Amazon warehouse employees push to unionize: Michael Sainato at The Guardian reports that as Amazon’s workforce has more than doubled over the past three years, workers at Amazon fulfilment centre warehouses in the United States have started organizing and pushing toward forming a union to fight back against the company’s treatment of its workers. Amazon’s global workforce reached more than 613,000 employees worldwide according to its latest quarterly earnings report, not including the 100,000 temporary employees the company hired for the holiday season. Continue reading…

Amazon listing variations use and abuse – your questions answered: Leah McHugh at Web Retailer reports that Amazon product variations are often used wrongly, sometimes by mistake and sometimes deliberately. Product listing policies are some of the least understood rules on the Amazon platform, and it’s easy to see why. They’re complicated. They differ for different categories, and the meaning of a policy often relies on how a specific word is defined. Sometimes, that special definition is not even provided to sellers in the available policy information. Continue reading…

Bonus: 6 Steps to Take When Dealing with Amazon Returns

Have a great weekend!

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