5 Interesting Stories from the World of Ecommerce This Week

  • Amazon news

Welcome to FeedbackExpress’ weekly round-up of the top five stories from the world of Amazon and ecommerce.

Amazon ponies up more money for warehouse workers after blowback: Spencer Soper at Bloomberg reports that Amazon is sweetening the pay for some of its longtime warehouse workers after employees criticised the loss of bonuses and stock awards as part of the company’s pledge to boost all wages to at least $15 an hour. Additionally, Amazon is introducing a new cash bonus of $1,500 to $3,000 for tenure milestones at five, 10, 15 and 20 years. Continue reading…

Amazon ditched AI recruiting tool that favoured men for technical jobs: Reuters via The Guardian reports that Amazon’s machine-learning specialists uncovered a big problem: their new recruiting engine did not like women. The team had been building computer programs since 2014 to review job applicants’ résumés, with the aim of mechanizing the search for top talent, five people familiar with the effort told Reuters. Automation has been key to Amazon’s ecommerce dominance, be it inside warehouses or driving pricing decisions. Continue reading…

Amazon is reportedly looking for retail space for its first UK cashierless supermarkets: Matthew Hughes at The Next Web reports that Amazon is currently looking to acquire a “significant number” of retail locations in the UK. These would most likely be used to bring its cashierless Amazon Go supermarkets to the British high street. According to the Sunday Times, Amazon is currently in the market for retail sites sized between 4,000 sq ft and 5,000. To give you a sense of scale, that’s roughly halfway between a Tesco Express convenience store, which can be as small as 2,000 sq ft, and a larger Tesco Metro supermarket, which can measure as much as 10,000 sq ft. Continue reading…

Benchmarking AmazonBasics: Joe at Marketplace Pulse reports that Amazon is building an army of brands, but AmazonBasics, one of the first the company launched, continues to outperform all of them combined. “It started with a simple battery,” Julie Creswell wrote in The New York Times, introducing the AmazonBasics brand Amazon launched in 2009. The batteries Amazon “makes” have become infamous thanks to them outselling established brands like Energizer and Duracell on Amazon. The AmazonBasics brand now includes thousands of different products – most generic essentials – in a dozen departments. Continue reading…

Who needs brand names? Now Amazon makes the stuff it sells: Nathaniel Meyersohn at CNN Business reports that Amazon’s private label sales will reach $7.5 billion this year and are expected to hit $25 billion in 2022. Amazon created its first private label brand in 2007 when it started selling bedding and bath products under the Pinzon line. Since then, Amazon has added 125 other brands. Continue reading…

Bonus: How to Price Private Label Products on Amazon

Have a great weekend!

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2018-10-12T15:33:35+00:00

About the Author:

Marketing Executive at FeedbackExpress.